3 Totally Different Ways to Schedule Senior Year Writing Guide for Your Teen

Here are 3 totally different ways to schedule Senior Year Writing Guide for your teen.

Schedule Senior Year Writing Guide for Your Teen

3 Totally Different Ways to Schedule Senior Year Writing Guide for Your Teen

I was chatting with one of our 7th Sisters the other day. (You knew there are only 6 of us 7Sisters, right? You’re our 7th Sister when you visit us here!) She wanted some different ideas for scheduling her teen’s work on our Guide to Senior Year Writing.

Schedule Senior Year Writing Guide for Your Teen
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She had a good question. We usually publish a planner/scheduler for our curriculum because there’s not ONE right way to homeschool: people have so many different schedules for their homeschool lives.

However, I came up with 3 common ways I’ve seen people schedule their 7Sisters High School Writing Bundles. So here are 3 totally different ways to schedule Senior Year Writing Guide for your teen.

Method #1: Spread the 4 guides included in Senior Year Writing over a 30-week school year, working some each day 4 days/week.

While your teen may work through the guides in any order, this order may be good for many seniors:

Guide to College Application Essay Writing: 1 week 

  • Day 1: Read through the guide and watch videos on page 6-7
  • Day 2: Brainstorm and choose topic and make notes.
  • Day 3: Write rough draft.
  • Day 4: Watch videos on page 10 and use guidelines on that page to do first revision. Have one or 2 people read it over. Let it sit 24 hours.
  • Day 5: Write final draft.

Guide to Professional Writing: 13 weeks

This curriculum has 11 topics. Your teen can do 9 of the topics at one topic per week. Two of the topics: “Writing an Expository Speech” and “Writing an Organizational Newsletter” lessons are split out over two weeks each.

After the Christmas break, do Guide to Chicago-Style Research Paper writing: 5 weeks

This curriculum is broken into 5 weeks of work with 1 session assignment per day.

Now for the fun part! Creative Chronicling: around 10 weeks (will vary according to the size of the project and the amount of detail your teen wants to include)

  • Day 1: Mom and teen should read through the curriculum together
  • Day 2: Using the Scheduling Backwards instructions on page 8, decide a deadline for completed project, then create a schedule.

Method #2: Block Schedule

In block scheduling, rather than spread writing over the entire year, teens complete their assignments in 1 semester with longer writing periods.

Consider this schedule:

Guide to College Application Essay Writing: 1 week

  • Day 1: Read through the guide and watch videos on page 6-7
  • Day 2: Brainstorm and choose topic and make notes.
  • Day 3: Write rough draft.
  • Day 4: Watch videos on page 10 and use guidelines on that page to do first revision. Have one or 2 people read it over. Let it sit 24 hours.
  • Day 5: Write final draft.

Guide to Professional Writing: 6 weeks

This curriculum has 11 topics. Your teen will do 2 topics per week. They will have long days in the lessons for “Writing an Expository Speech” and “Writing an Organizational Newsletter”.

Guide to Chicago-Style Research Paper writing: 3 weeks

This curriculum is broken into 5 weeks of work with 1 session assignment per day. In block scheduling, students will work through 2 lessons per day instead of 1 lesson.

Creative Chronicling: around 5 weeks (will vary according to the size of the project and the amount of detail your teen wants to include)

  • Day 1: Mom and teen should read through the curriculum together
  • Day 2: Using the Scheduling Backwards instructions on page 8, decide a deadline for completed project, then create a schedule.

Method #3: Teen creates his/her own schedule

Read through with your teen, the Scheduling Backwards instructions on page 8 of Creative Chronicling and/or download the freebie: Scheduling Backwards.

Ask your teen to choose the deadline date for each of the guides. Then create a schedule backwards for the work they will do and when. Have them write it on a calendar or enter it on their digital calendar. Have them show you their calendar and discuss their plans.

The benefit of this method is that it encourages independent writing and some life-prep maturity (which they will need when they go to college).

Download your Guide to Senior Year Writing and have a wonderful Senior Year!

 

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3 Totally Different Ways to Schedule Senior Year Writing Guide for Your Teen

Vicki Tillman

Blogger, curriculum developer at 7SistersHomeschool.com, counselor, life and career coach, SYMBIS guide, speaker, prayer person. 20+year veteran homeschool mom.

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