• Homeschool Help: Your Turn to Talk

    By Sabrina Justison on 19 September 2014 / Community, Helping Each Other / 5 Comments

    There are 2 questions below that we've heard this week from some of our homeschool friends:

    (Some of you are shy and share with us but feel funny posting here...which is always fine! Feel free to email thoughts and concerns to sabrina@7sistershomeschool.com!)

     

    Homeschool Help: Your Turn to Talk

    Homeschool Help: Your Turn to Talk

     

    - My teen likes to write but has lots of trouble getting thoughts organized for research writing. How can I HELP without accidentally doing it FOR him?

    - My kid handles it just fine when things don't work out the way she thought it would. In fact, she doesn't even seem to care! I want to encourage her to be responsible without becoming grace-less and overly focused on performance. Ideas, anyone?

    Do you have help to offer? C'mon, don't keep all your great ideas to yourself!

    It's YOUR TURN TO TALK.

    Offer ideas to help homeschoolers conquer the challenges above, or start another topic in your comment; it's up to you.

     

    If you need Homeschool Help: YOUR TURN to Talk!

    Tell us what's bugging you, frustrating you, confusing you, intimidating you. Let's all put our heads together and see if we can help each other.

    If you can offer someone else Homeschool Help: YOUR TURN to Talk!

    Tell us what's working great in your homeschool. Share success stories -- you are not bragging, because we ASKED you to tell us the good stuff to encourage us all.

    On Saturdays, we want you to comment here. There's no set theme. This is an "open thread" post.

     

    These simple rules will suffice:

    1. Start your comment with a topic word or phrase, like "Algebra I," or "editing writing," or "time management." That will make it easy for people to scroll through and read more on the topics that most interest them.

    2. If you are responding to someone who already commented, use the SAME topic they used.

    3. Keep it judgment-free! We need encouragement. We need ideas. We don't need to slam each other if we disagree. There are no cookie-cutters for creating homeschool success.

    4. If you share a link, make sure it's relevant. Spammy links will be deleted by admins.

    That's about it!

    SO...

    What's going on in your homeschool this week?

    Homeschool Help: Your Turn to Talk


  • Why Your Homeschooler Needs a High School Philosophy Course

    By Vicki Tillman on 18 September 2014 / High School, Social Studies & More / 0 Comment

    Teens need to think about big ideas. They need to be introduced to the ideas that have shaped the world. 

    Philosophy is a POWERFUL subject for homeschool high schoolers to capture on their transcripts. As homeschool mom, group class teacher and advisor, I (and many teens I work with) believe that philosophy has been one of their most valuable courses. Let me tell you 3 reasons.

    high school philosophy course

    High School Philosophy Course

    Homeschool high schoolers should study philosophy because:

    1) History credits become more valuable when homeschoolers also study philosophy

    These days, high school history students are not simply supposed to regurgitate dates and facts. They need to be able to analyze, compare, contrast, and perspective-take regarding peoples and places of the past and present. When teens understand the philosophic mindsets of other people in other places and times, they can climb into those folks' shoes and better understand their cultures and decisions. This helps them be better prepared to write essays and reaction papers (as in SATs  and college classes).

    high school philosophy course

    This is the reason I asked my philosophy-teacher son, Dr. Micah Tillman, to help me write a TRULY USEFUL world history textbook. It is a text that helps students understand the ways people have thought throughout time and how they made cultural decisions based on that thought.

     

    high school philosophy course

    World History and Philosophy is the result of our collaboration. The philosophers and philosophies are integrated into an accessible survey of World History to show in a light-hearted manner that average (non-philosopher) high schoolers can enjoy.

    It is written for the average high school student to read and enjoy (self-study and NO busywork) with additional readings and assignments that help the college prep and honors students get their appropriate levels for their transcripts.

    2) When homeschoolers study philosophy, they become aware of the philosophies that permeate our culture.

    News stories, advertisements, health care, politics, sports, cooking trends, music and fashion are all influenced by philosophic ideas.

    3) Philosophy adds sparkle to the transcript.

    The competition is heavy for college entrance these days. Your homeschooling high schooler will find it beneficial to have courses that are a little different than the normal, boring  "World History" that is on most teens' transcripts. Philosophy is one of those sparkle-making courses. World History combined with Philosophy is powerfully sparkly!

    Click here for my World History and Philosophy Pinterest board. (It has links to cool resources and Youtube videos.)

    BTW- For homeschoolers who have already completed World History and Philosophy and now have the philosophy bug: Dr. Micah Tillman has written a full credit course called Philosophy in Four Questions (we hope to be able to release the text later in the summer). Another light-hearted, self-study, accessible, with NO busywork text, Dr. Tillman addresses philosophy's four great questions and the philosophies that address those questions.

    And while you're getting your new academic year well-structured, watch Sabrina's vlog about how to Schedule Backwards (and download her FREE whitepaper on the Scheduling Backwards)!

     

    High School Philosophy Course


  • How to Learn from Failure with our Teens

    By Sabrina Justison on 17 September 2014 / Challenges, Encouragement, High School / 1 Comment

    Homeschool transcripts show high school years full of academics, electives, service, career exploration and more. Homeschool parents want a glittering record of awesome accomplishments in place by graduation.  But failure is bound to happen sometime...somewhere...with something.

    learn from failure with teens

    Learn from Failure with Teens

    A teen may experience academic failure, but it's just as likely to be failure to achieve a goal of some other sort. Being cut from a sports team says, "Failure!" to teens. Not getting hired for that first-choice part-time job speaks it, too. While no one will deny that these moments hurt, we can see something powerful and truly GOOD come about as we learn from failure with our teens.

    Trying things is an important part of high school, and trying new things almost guarantees some failures along the way.  New endeavors, or new levels of commitment to something only dabbled-in before help students determine their direction for after graduation, grow as individuals, and form relationships with like-minded people.  Truth is, no one is good at everything, and no one really loves everything he or she tries.

    While teaching commitment is a priority as we build character in our children, it also needs to be okay to try something and determine that it is not a great fit and not worth continuing.  We need to teach our kids the difference between quitting and deciding to end something.

     

    Quitting

    is what we do when we're tired of doing something that costs us. It is a reaction to something outside of us that makes us uncomfortable.

    Deciding to end something

    is the result of a careful, intentional evaluation of an endeavor. When we wisely determine that our time and energy would actually be better spent elsewhere, we may decide to end something because doing so is best.

     


    Learning to choose between good and better...

    between what is a good fit for someone else but feels way out of my area of strength and calling...

    between something that can be peripheral but not a core priority for this season...

    these are life-equipping skills that our kids need to make good choices in the decades to come as well as right now.

    Even academic "failure" can be a good thing.  Most students hit a subject in high school that is a real stretch.  Especially for kids who have always found academic success near at hand, facing that first "failure" (for some of these kids they think that getting anything less than 100% is failure!) is confidence-battering.  Allowing them to perform poorly while encouraging them to do what is possible for THEM equips them to understand that they are going to struggle and do things less-than-perfectly in life, and sometimes a job barely done is truly all that is possible.

    May I share a personal story?

    When I was a teen, I had a heart for people with suffering from mental illness. The vocal ensemble with which I sang in high school performed Christmas music at our state psych hospital, and I decided some time after that to volunteer twice a month on Saturdays with the occupational therapists, using the arts to help patients in their recovery. After about 6 visits, I decided to end my volunteer service there.

     

    I didn't quit; I decided to end my service.

    I carefully evaluated how things were working out and talked it over with my parents. I found that the level of personal boundaries necessary for successful work with psych inpatients was not something I possessed at just-turned-18. I felt like I was failing because I wanted to be a help to these folks, but all I knew was that conversations kept going scary places when I was with them, and I was fighting wicked stomach-aches before the end of the volunteer day because I was so nervous. My goal was to be a kind and positive influence in the lives of people battling for their mental health. I determined that I could not achieve that goal in the setting before me.

     

    I believe in hard work.  I believe in teaching our kids to stick to it when things get tough.  But I also know that any person's identity has to be tied to more than his ability to achieve whatever goal is before him.  We need to be able to fall short of a goal with peace and gratitude for the God who loves us all in our insufficiency.  We need to help our teens understand how to extend grace to themselves and to others when they don't hit the bullseye.

     

    Can we be brave enough to learn from failure with our teens?

    Can we have honest conversation with them as they look at something hard in their lives?

    Can we resist the urge to be snow-plow parents, moving all the obstacles out of their way so they won't struggle, protecting them from discomfort...because we know that would only lead to teaching them to be quitters?

    BUT...

    Can we also fight the fear of what others might think of us if we face the truth that a class, or a job, or a relationship, or a sport, or a service project is actually NOT yielding fruit that is worth the cost to our teen?

     

    I love seeing my teen succeed in high school.But I'm praying for the boldness to also love seeing him fail, failure with peace and with courage and with the ability to learn from it all.

    I want to learn from failure with my teen.

    learn from failure teens

    For a tremendous true story of failure and redemption, read Charles Colson's Born Again with your homeschool high school student! 7Sisters NO-busywork literature study guide helps you dig into this powerful account of what one man learned from failure.


  • Research Paper Fun - Practical Tips for Teens

    By Sabrina Justison on 16 September 2014 / High School, Homeschool Information, Lang. Arts - Lit. & Writing / 0 Comment

    Do any of you have high school homeschool students who say, "I want to do something FUN this weekend; may I write a research paper, please??"

    If you do, this post probably isn't for you.

    If not, read on!

    research paper fun

    Research Paper Fun

    Vicki Tillman has written an introductory guide to research paper writing following APA style guidelines. You can find it here in our ebookstore.

    A few years ago, my son wrote a 10-page paper using her guide, and the topic for his paper was an imaginary country! Granted, there is no real research to be done when one writes a paper on an imaginary country, but if what your teen needs most is practice writing according to very particular style rules and formats, this can be a great way to get the job done and have fun at the same time.

    I talked with some homeschool friends recently who took on a similar writing project and imagined a country where the people groups were named for various muscles in the human body. One of the teen boys who is really into body-building told me that there were two primary classes of people in their country - the Triceps and the Biceps. The Triceps were the workers, the backbone of society, the responsible and diligent citizens. The Biceps were the "pretty boys" who looked good but didn't really get much actual work done.

    Adorable! I laughed so hard!

    People groups decided, the kids were working on the topography of their land (I imagine it's not a flat terrain...probably has lots of bulk and definition), the languages (lots of grunting, perhaps?), the weather (warm enough to break a sweat, no doubt), the history, the government, the economy, the arts, and so forth. Since an APA style paper is divided into sections with headings instead of the transitions required in an MLA paper, it lends itself neatly to this exercise. Inventing your sources so that you can correctly cite them is another fun activity in itself!

    research paper fun

    Certainly using Vicki's guide to write a true research paper about a topic that can actually BE researched is ideal. But if your student's needs would best be met by forgoing the research this time around and focusing on the style and format, following the directions to a T, why not get a little goofy and invent a topic instead?

    Have you looked at the excerpts from Vicki's guide in our ebookstore?

    Take a moment and see how friendly it is, and how much fun!

    Homeschooling

     Research Paper Fun


  • Balancing Life and the Homeschool Transcript

    By Vicki Tillman on 15 September 2014 / Encouragement, High School, Transcripts / 2 Comments

    Homeschool moms sometimes feel SOOO much pressure to perform. What if their kid doesn’t get into Wossamotta U on a full-ride scholarship? What if their homeschooler doesn’t even get into Wossamotta U at all?

    Under great pressure to have the world’s best academic transcript, some homeschool high schoolers are graduating and heading off to college with some solid academic skills but little preparation for life, love and the pursuit of their faith. THERE JUST WASN’T TIME! SAT prep and across-the-board honors courses swallowed up the hours…

    homeschool transcript

    Homeschool Transcript

    What if you gain the whole world and lose your kid?

    Mark 8:35-37 Homeschool Application Bible

    For whosoever mom will save her pride shall lose it; but whosoever mom shall lose her pride for my sake and the gospel’s, the same shall save it.

    For what shall it profit a mom, if she gain great SAT scores for her homeschooler and a killer-transcript, and lose her own teen?

    Or what shall a mom give in exchange for her own kid?

    Instead of endless hours on academics and no time for life preparation: Why not aim LOWER?

    Here are 7 things to check to see if your homeschool is out of balance:

    1. Does your homeschool have appropriate-leveled expectations for your high school kid (honors where honors is due, average where average is best use of time)?

    Here’s a good post from Sabrina about choosing levels

     

    2. Does your homeschool high school day include spiritual development?

    Have you genuinely taught and modeled for your teen how to have a deep and meaningful relationship with God? How to read the Bible for more than “obligation”? How to pray intercessorily for others? How to pray for oneself? To have fun with prayer? How to listen? (Here’s a link to a classic book I think upperclassmen should read and discuss: Hearing God by Dallas Willard. Here’s a link our Prayer Journals that take in interactive, light-hearted approach to prayer.)

     

    3. Has your homeschool high school wrestled with the tough areas of living faith in a faithless world?

    Have your teens been exposed to the hard questions facing today’s young people like sex, drugs, and homosexuality? Have they studied Apologetics? Dr. Gerald Culley’s Apologetics classes are FREE here: http://7sistershomeschool.com/products-page/apologetics-presentations-free/

     

    4. Has your homeschool high schooler done some solid Career Exploration?

    Have you done enough Career Exploration to record a credit on the transcript? Has your teen noticed how God is leading? What God has already done in his life? The gifts and talents He has given her? The desires of his heart? Here are links to our FREE Get-Started Career Exploration Questionnaire and the Career Exploration Workbook.

     

    5. Does your teen practice social skills?

    No, really. Out in the world, the way people present themselves can make a difference in college and career. Does your homeschool high schooler know basic etiquette and social skills? Can he start a conversation? Can she use the right fork at a restaurant? Can he sneeze politely? Can she contribute appropriately to a group conversation? Can he show respect to a college teacher?

     

    6. Do your homeschool high schoolers know how to manage relationships?

    Do they know healthy friend skills? Do they know boundary setting skills? Do they know how to have a healthy romance? (I personally like the Boundaries series to help with this.)

     

    7. Does your teen know how to practice basic self-care?

    Does he or she remember to eat and drink appropriately? De-stress? Sleep well? Online game or use social-media responsibly?

     

    Homeschool Moms, you will not have to worry about standing before God and proving that your high schooler had an awesome transcript. It would be good to balance the eternal with the academic. God bless!

     

    Homeschool Transcript


  • The Difference Between Consumer Math and Financial Literacy

    By Sabrina Justison on 14 September 2014 / High School, Math & Economics / 0 Comment

    Financial Literacy is worth so much more than simple Consumer Math. In high school, our students need a Consumer Math credit, but we offer them rich life skills when we go beyond that basic requirement and equip our teens with Financial Literacy. Here's help for understanding the difference between Consumer Math and Financial Literacy.

    Consumer Math Financial Literacy

    Consumer Math and Financial Literacy

    The difference between Consumer Math and Financial Literacy is this:

    Consumer Math is the study of practical mathematical techniques that are used in commerce and normal, daily life.

     

    Financial Literacy is a course of study that equips students to use those same consumer math techniques, but also:

    $ - equips them to understand the implications of attitudes toward money,

    $ -  teaches the vocabulary necessary to understand finance in the news,

    $ - teaches them to observe and evaluate the use of money in the world,

    $ - and encourages them to explore a variety of ways to make money, to invest money, to give money away, to save money, and to wisely spend money.

     

    A Consumer Math credit teaches a student to understand an amortization schedule for a loan.

    Financial Literacy prepares a student to decide when taking out a loan is a worthwhile risk and when it is simply foolish.

     

    A Consumer Math credit teaches a student how to compare and take advantage of sale prices at a retail store.

    Financial Literacy prepares a student to understand how the strategies used to set prices can also be employed by an individual in an entrepreneurial endeavor.

     

    A Consumer Math credit explains, "This is HOW money works in this situation."

    Financial Literacy starts by explaining how money works in a situation and then goes on to reveal much more. "This is WHY money works that way, and you can apply that understanding to all sorts of life scenarios for greater financial success!"

    Consumer Math Financial Literacy

    Sara Hayes, author of the upcoming Financial Literacy curriculum from 7Sisters

    7Sister Sara Hayes is finishing work on a Financial Literacy curriculum that will be available to you after the first of the year 2015. Her reason for taking on the daunting task of creating this curriculum? She says,

    "As your children graduate high school and move on to college and ‘real life’, you (and they) will be thankful if they have learned the difference between needs and wants, and how to master their money, rather than being mastered by it."

    Look for more on this exciting new resource in the coming weeks. While Consumer Math is important, Financial Literacy offers so much more.

    Consumer Math and Financial LiteracyIn the meantime, check out the many FREE resources available for download in the EBookstore. Making use of good FREE materials is a financially literate choice!

     

    Consumer Math and Financial Literacy


  • Homeschool Help: Your Turn to Talk

    By Sabrina Justison on 12 September 2014 / Challenges, Helping Each Other / 0 Comment

    There are 3 questions below that we've heard this week from some of our homeschool friends:

    (Some of you are shy and share with us but feel funny posting here...which is always fine! Feel free to email thoughts and concerns to sabrina@7sistershomeschool.com!)

     

    Homeschool Help: Your Turn to Talk

    Homeschool Help: Your Turn to Talk

     

    - How do I deal with stall tactics? My kid seems to have so many pressing needs when it's time to work on a school task. Tweens and teens come up with some REALLY creative stall tactics. How can I get 'em moving on the school work without turning every day into a battle?

    - Do you approach your homeschool high school day in terms of HOURS of schoolwork, or a specific list of tasks to accomplish, or some other way?

    - My teen is terrible at following directions. Driver's Ed is coming up soon and I worry that this is going to mess him up in trying to earn his driver's license. How can we improve direction following for a kid who is smart, just struggles in this area for some reason?

    Do you have help to offer? C'mon, don't keep all your great ideas to yourself!

    It's YOUR TURN TO TALK.

    Offer ideas to help homeschoolers conquer the challenges above, or start another topic in your comment; it's up to you.

     

    If you need Homeschool Help: YOUR TURN to Talk!

    Tell us what's bugging you, frustrating you, confusing you, intimidating you. Let's all put our heads together and see if we can help each other.

    If you can offer someone else Homeschool Help: YOUR TURN to Talk!

    Tell us what's working great in your homeschool. Share success stories -- you are not bragging, because we ASKED you to tell us the good stuff to encourage us all.

    On Saturdays, we want you to comment here. There's no set theme. This is an "open thread" post.

     

    These simple rules will suffice:

    1. Start your comment with a topic word or phrase, like "Algebra I," or "editing writing," or "time management." That will make it easy for people to scroll through and read more on the topics that most interest them.

    2. If you are responding to someone who already commented, use the SAME topic they used.

    3. Keep it judgment-free! We need encouragement. We need ideas. We don't need to slam each other if we disagree. There are no cookie-cutters for creating homeschool success.

    4. If you share a link, make sure it's relevant. Spammy links will be deleted by admins.

    That's about it!

    SO...

    What's going on in your homeschool this week?

    Homeschool Help: Your Turn to Talk


  • Critical Thinking Skills for Homeschoolers

    By Sabrina Justison on 11 September 2014 / High School, Lang. Arts - Lit. & Writing, Social Studies & More / 0 Comment

    Critical thinking means evaluating an issue to form a judgment about it. A simple definition would be: thinking about the thinking behind something.  Critical Thinking means challenging assumptions, those of other people and those in your own mind.

    It's important to equip homeschoolers with the observational and critical thinking skills that will make them great thinkers because these skills will serve them in all arenas for the rest of their lives.  Sure, some academic learning requires the memorization of facts that must simply be spit back to prove mastery of the material. But many subjects like literature, history, science, and social sciences are exciting places to instead focus on the art and skill of critical thinking.

    critical thinking for homeschoolers

    Critical Thinking for Homeschoolers

    Socrates was a Greek philosopher who loved conversation with his students.  His idea of good teaching was to encourage his students to think for themselves rather than to simply repeat back what they had heard from him or any other teacher.  Sounds like a good approach to me!

    Benjamin Franklin famously wrote: "It is the first responsibility of every citizen to question authority."

    Counter-culture leader Timothy Leary later completely misused that idea in the late 1960's in the United States.

    But Socrates probably provided the richest, most intelligent application of the healthy way of questioning authority a couple thousand years ago. (For more from Socrates, check out 7Sisters literature study guide to accompany Books I and II of Plato's Republic. Plato was a student of Socrates, and it is from his ancient writings that we have the most information about this wise and influential teacher.)

    I remember seeing graffiti once that said, "Question Authority." Underneath, some other person with no respect for bathroom walls had written, "What will you do if Authority answers?" As a Christian, I want my children to grow up questioning authority in an appropriate way.  Before you decide I'm a heretic who is raising a generation of heretics, allow me to explain.

    God loves conversation.  He is not made uncomfortable by questions. Over and over again in the Bible we see people who were eager to follow after God who dared to ask Him questions.  Our limited human minds, muddled by sin, lack the perfect understanding to always understand God's wisdom.  God invites, even encourages us to question Him when we do not understand.  That questioning must be done in an attitude of humility, because the fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom, but it is not a sign of weak faith when we question Him because we TRULY DESIRE to hear His answer.

    There are many earthly authorities, and none of them are right in EVERYthing they are saying.  My children are growing up with the internet.  Things that are published on the internet appear to speak with authority. They need the ability to discern truth from error regardless of the tone of authority in which something may be asserted.

    By helping my students to observe and think critically about

         * the literature they are reading,

     

         * the historical accounts they are studying,

     

         * the current events they are observing,

     

         * the scientific research they are examining,

    I can be much less afraid that their minds will be ruined by exposure to something contrary to God's word.  As students grow in wisdom and approach adulthood, I can equip them for thinking critically about the many words that will be spoken to them with authority, genuine or feigned.

    And as far as the bathroom graffiti goes, doesn't it stand to reason that students who question authority in an appropriate manner will RECOGNIZE and RESPECT it when true Authority answers?  God loves to reveal truth to those who seek Him!

    Critical Thinking for Homeschoolers

    For a World History e-text full of encouragement for critical thinking, take a look at Vicki Tillman's World History and Philosophy.

    This was my youngest son's favorite History course in high school. Great stuff!


  • 5 Things 9th Graders Need to Know

    By Vicki Tillman on 10 September 2014 / By Age Group, High School / 0 Comment

    I was working with a group of homeschool 9th graders recently. They were sitting bright-eyed and nervous on their first day of group classes. Their first day in high school. Big stuff!

    9th Graders Need to Know

    9th Graders Need to Know

    I asked them why they were here.

    “To learn”

    “To take some classes my mom didn’t want to teach”

    “Because it’s fun to be in this group”

    I asked why they were here on earth.

    *nervous silence*

    I rephrased: What is God’s purpose for you?

    *worried silence*

    Many 9th graders haven’t given life after high school much thought- maybe just enough thought to be stressed about it. Some worry that they are pointless beings, not-good-enough, or don’t matter.

    So I went ahead and told them the answer:

    “God never makes a mistake. He has you here on earth for a purpose. He has a story He is writing in your life. He will use you to write His story in the lives of others. Homeschool high school is the perfect time to prepare yourself to be in that story:

    -Learn how He made you (the things you’re good at, the things that make your feel like you’ve done well or been a blessing)

    -Learn how to use words so that you can explain things (like life, the Gospel, friendship, etc.) to others

    -Learn how to balance hard work (like studying boring or difficult subjects), fun, and self-care

    -Learn to treat yourselves and others well

    -Learn how to accept that you matter, you have a purpose.”

    There were some sighs of relief and smiles.

    We’ve already settled 5 necessary things that 9th graders need to know.

    :)

    9th Graders Need to Know


  • Narnia for High School Students

    By Vicki Tillman on 09 September 2014 / High School, Lang. Arts - Lit. & Writing / 0 Comment

    Most homeschooling families have read The Chronicles of Narnia to their elementary-aged children, but have you considered Narnia for your High School student?

    Here are 4 reasons why your homeschool TEEN should study The Chronicles of Narnia using 7Sisters Literature Study Guides to help them uncover rich ideas with NO busywork.

    Narnia for High School

    1) Narnia for High School Students introduces them to deep theology.

    Lewis wove powerful theological concepts throughout all seven of the Chronicles of Narnia books using symbolism (a concept akin to allegory and explained in our Chronicles of Narnia Study Guides).

    • Obviously Aslan is a symbol of Christ, but the books are riddled with other symbolic pictures.
    • Eustace being "dragoned" and "undragoned"  offers pictures of sin and redemption.
    • Caspian and Edmund's argument at Deathwater Island serves as a symbol of the blinding power of greed.
    • The witch's speech in The Silver Chair as she tried to twist truth and lure the children into captivity is a powerful symbol of satan's lies by which he tries to ensnare us.
    • The list goes on and on...

    2) Narnia for High School Students helps teens discover basic philosophy.

    Each book has some basic philosophic symbolism. For instance, the underground captivity of Prince Rilian is a symbol of Plato's Allegory of the Cave. Teens really benefit from exploring the basics of philosophy; this post explains 3 Reasons Why High Schoolers Should Study Philosophy.)

    3) Narnia for High School Students enables them to learn great writing strategies from C.S. Lewis.

    Lewis' Narnia stories popularized the myth-fantasy genre. He followed a detailed strategy to prepare the stories:

    • devising a sub-creation,
    • developing surprising friendships,
    • detailing a defeat of evil.

    Lewis also used some of the Narnia stories to express a special type of literature. The Last Battle, for instance, is an example of apocalyptic literature and The Voyage of the Dawn Treader is an epic.

    4) Narnia for High School Students offers teens a creative vehicle for critical thinking.

    Each of the Narnia books offers, through symbolism and the personal development of each character, opportunities for teens to develop their critical thinking skills. As teens prepare to enter adulthood, strong critical thinking skills is one of the best tools with which we can equip them. Our Narnia Study Guides ask questions to help teens grow in their thinking, practicing skills that will serve them well for the rest of their lives.

    Not just for the little ones -- Narnia for High School Students!

    Narnia for High School

    Click the image to view excerpts from the Narnia study guides.

    Homeschooling


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