• Poetry Writing in Homeschool - Here's How!

    By Sabrina Justison on 29 September 2014 / High School Language Arts, Homeschool High School, Middle School / 1 Comment

    Have you included poetry writing in your homeschool?

    Here are ideas to get you writing poems, whether you LOVE poetry (as we do here at 7Sisters) or whether it intimidates you.

    Poetry Writing in Homeschool

    Poetry Writing in Homeschool

     

    First, check to see if poetry scares you. (It's okay; we won't tell!) If you find that it does, this short vlog will encourage you with a light-hearted approach to exploring verse.

    Next, check to see if you and your homeschooler have READ much poetry. Poetry writing in homeschool benefits from poetry reading! There are so many types of verse, and everyone seems to be drawn to certain meters, particular rhyme schemes, styles, themes, vocabulary, types of poetic language...

    If you haven't read much poetry yet, take a look at a few of my favorite starting places for exploring poems. Some are "childish" -- that's okay! Some of the most inspiring poems I find were written to be understood (at least on ONE level) by children.

    Shel Silverstein

    Silly and free: The Mehoo with and Exactlywatt

    Poignant and metered: Where the Sidewalk Ends

    Robert Louis Stevenson

    Metered, Rhyming and Contemplative: The Land of Counterpane

    Metered, Rhyming and Playful: The Wind

    Poetry Writing in Homeschool

    Or dig in deeper with these study guides from the 7Sisters Ebookstore to accompany

    TS Eliot's Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats

    or

    British Poetry (various poets)

    Poetry Writing in Homeschool

    Now pick up a pen and try this first lesson from Vicki Tillman's Introductory Guide to Poetry Writing (also available in the EBookstore for $6.99).

     

    Poetic Language

    Poetry Writing in Homeschool

     

    Poetry Writing in Homeschool

     

    Poetry Writing in Homeschool

     

    Poetic language is one of the building blocks for writing poetry. Playing with words and exploring poetic language is a smart starting place for poetry writing in your homeschool.

    Next steps?

    - Explore the connections possible between sounds and word meanings and the five senses.

    - Listen for rhythm in strings of words. Play with rhymes.

    - Poetry writing in your homeschool offers so many fun possibilities! Get started and see what you come up with.

     

    For more from Vicki Tillman on Poetry Writing, look at excerpts from her Intermediate and Advanced Poetry Writing Guides.

    Poetry Writing in Homeschool

     

    Hip Homeschool Moms

  • Homeschool Consumer Math Often Misses the Mark

    By Sabrina Justison on 28 September 2014 / By Age Group, Homeschool High School, Math & Economics / 3 Comments

    Consumer Math used to be almost a throw-away course. It's what we decided to cover for a non-college-bound teen, a kid who needed one more Math credit on the homeschool transcript. It was supposed to be easy-peasy, mostly obvious stuff, with a few amortization tables thrown in and some practice keeping a checkbook. I am a bit red-faced to admit that this is pretty much all I provided for my four homeschooled kids in high school, and now that the youngest has graduated, I wish I had understood sooner that homeschool consumer math often misses the mark.

    homeschool consumer math

    A simple definition of Consumer Math is this:  the set of practical arithmetic and other math skills used in commerce and daily life.

    Financial Literacy is what our kids need.

    (For more on the difference between the two, you can read The Difference Between Consumer Math and Financial Literacy here.)

    As we have been finalizing Sara Hayes' new ebook text for High School Financial Literacy here at 7Sisters, I've been facing the hard truth that I left a big gap in my kids' learning in high school. I'm thankful that they are all still somewhat open to my guidance even now that they are young adults, and I hope to take some of the new things I'm learning about Financial Literacy and fill in some of that gap.

     

    An international study by the OECD yielded this sobering observation:

    “Developing financial literacy skills and knowledge is critical now that individuals are becoming increasingly responsible at an ever earlier age for financial risks affecting their future...” (OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría)

     

    I, for one, had not thought of it quite that way before, but the Secretary-General is right.

    - The internet has changed the world forever.

    - The advances in technology and gadgets have done away with the idea that a teen is saving up only to try to buy a car ('cause he also needs a smart phone, a tablet...).

    - Money is physically handled differently than it was even 10 years ago (plastic doesn't mean what it did when I was a teen).

    - The opportunities for debt are so readily available.

    - The impact of social media on credit reports is not an urban legend.

    - The constant bombardment of the media has led to an epidemic of "affluenza" in our young people,

    - and on and on!

     

    Instead of simply knowing how to track the flow of money in and out of her checking and savings accounts, how to plan for major purchases and budget for day-to-day expenses, our daughters now need to have a much broader base of literacy in regards to financial matters.

    Instead of just practice accurately reading interest tables and amortization schedules, our sons now need a whole vocabulary to make sense of the financial world; they need a way to discern what is a reputable source of information and what is a scam instead.

     

    I am sad that homeschool consumer math missed the mark with my own kids.

    I spent an uncomfortable evening with one of my grown children a few months back re-vamping the budgeting strategy that wasn't quite cutting it, helping that child deal with a hefty piece of humble pie even as I choked it down myself. Since that night, our conversation has been much more often focused on looking into expanding our true financial literacy (yep, I'm learning a bunch of new stuff right alongside my kids!).

    I'll be sharing about our adventure from time to time here on the blog. If sharing honestly about my mistakes can help someone else whose kids are a bit younger than mine, I will be so happy! God has a way of redeeming our messes. He's cool like that.

     

     


  • Homeschool Help: Your Turn to Talk

    By Sabrina Justison on 26 September 2014 / Community, Encouragement, Helping Each Other / 0 Comment

    There are 3 questions below that we've heard this week from some of our homeschool friends:

    (Some of you are shy and share with us but feel funny posting here...which is always fine! Feel free to email thoughts and concerns to sabrina@7sistershomeschool.com!)

     

    Homeschool Help: Your Turn to Talk

    Homeschool Help: Your Turn to Talk

     

    - A lot of my friends are doing lots of what I think of as "seat-work" with workbook pages and things, my son doesn't seem ready for it. Should I be pushing for more of that for Kindergarten?

    - My middle school daughter is spacey much of the time. She's not dumb, but she seems so distracted and it's hard for her to get her work done. This is a new-ish problem; she's always enjoyed homeschool before and likes schoolwork.

    - High School Phys Ed for a kid who doesn't play any team sports...ideas?

     

    Do you have help to offer? C'mon, don't keep all your great ideas to yourself!

    It's YOUR TURN TO TALK.

    Offer ideas to help homeschoolers conquer the challenges above, or start another topic in your comment; it's up to you.

     

    If you need Homeschool Help: YOUR TURN to Talk!

    Tell us what's bugging you, frustrating you, confusing you, intimidating you. Let's all put our heads together and see if we can help each other.

    If you can offer someone else Homeschool Help: YOUR TURN to Talk!

    Tell us what's working great in your homeschool. Share success stories -- you are not bragging, because we ASKED you to tell us the good stuff to encourage us all.

    On Saturdays, we want you to comment here. There's no set theme. This is an "open thread" post.

     

    These simple rules will suffice:

    1. Start your comment with a topic word or phrase, like "Algebra I," or "editing writing," or "time management." That will make it easy for people to scroll through and read more on the topics that most interest them.

    2. If you are responding to someone who already commented, use the SAME topic they used.

    3. Keep it judgment-free! We need encouragement. We need ideas. We don't need to slam each other if we disagree. There are no cookie-cutters for creating homeschool success.

    4. If you share a link, make sure it's relevant. Spammy links will be deleted by admins.

    That's about it!

    SO...

    What's going on in your homeschool this week?

    Homeschool Help: Your Turn to Talk


  • Brain Development in Children

    By Sabrina Justison on 25 September 2014 / By Subject, Science, Psych, & Health / 0 Comment

    What's going on in your homeschooler's brain when you are teaching him?

    Here's a look at brain development and how it affects learning, taken from 7Sisters high school textbook Human Development from a Christian Worldview by Vicki Tillman, MA.

    brain development in children

     Brain Development in Children

    Kindergarteners

    A Kindergartener's brain cells have been working on developing branches called axons and dendrites. These branches help retrieve and transfer information around the brain. The efficiency of these branches allow children to think in more mature manners than pre-schoolers. 5 year-olds have mastered symbols (like riding a broomstick for a horse) but they can't do abstract thinking (they don't understand patriotism, algebra, or electricity). They love to classify but may have trouble sorting objects by more than one characteristic (like big, blue beads from little, round beads). Their thinking is usually characterized by irreversibility (they might be able to add but to try to subtract by thinking that it is the reverse of adding might be difficult). Kindergarteners generally learn best in a hands-on, multisensory manner, like these alphabet learning activities.

    Grades 1-2

    Early elementary homeschoolers are in what we call the "5 to 7 shift". The growth of their brain cells from the ages of 5-7 goes in spurts and in uneven through the brain. In lessons it looks like this: He grasped the fact that 7 + 7= 14 yesterday, but it is GONE today. (Concepts at this age are kind of like God's mercies- they are new every morning). However, their thought patterns are more logical and they can classify from several aspects. They can usually do some basic reversibility: they can handle this series 5 + 9=14 and 14-9=5 (at least, on some days). Like Kindergarteners, they often learn best in a hands-on situation, although many have begun to differentiate into various learning styles.

    brain development in children

    Human Development from a Christian Worldview High School Text $24.99

    Grades 3-5

    Many later elementary homeschoolers have well-established neural patterns. They can choose to concentrate and are aware of when they are excited about a topic or bored with it. They can problem-solve in age-appropriate cases (like word problems in math) and try various strategies for completing a task (like assembling models or doing science experiments). Their memory capacity and retrieval is much stronger, which helps in memorizing spelling words and Bible verses. They can infer (read between the lines) in simple cases. These youngsters are capable of longer and more complex study times than their grade 1-2 counterparts.

    Middle School

    Homeschoolers in middle school have developed the beginnings of metacognition. Metacognition is the ability to monitor one's own thinking, memory, goals, knowledge, and activities. It occurs as the brain gradually coats its neurons with an oily-coating called myelin. Myelin sheathing gradually develops over childhood and is complete by sometime in adolescence. With this myelination comes better self monitoring (staying on task during lessons), memorization skills, and logical imagination. They can think abstractly and read between the lines in more complex situations, do more in-depth problem solving, and learn about writing stories with plots. They learn best in their own learning style.

    brain development in children

    Middle Schoolers give Metacognition an enthusiastic thumbs-up!

    (For ideas on encouraging metacognitive processes, check out this article from education.com)

    High School

    Although it varies wildly from teen to teen, the brain cells usually complete the myelination process during high school. You know when it hits because your homeschooler starts to think about what he's thinking about, perspective-take in an in-depth manner, speculate, hypothesize, and imagine in ways much greater than before. They have mastered abstract thought so are ready for concepts such as algebra, patriotism, politics, the "why" of religion, and poetry. They can handle literary analysis, word problems that involve more than one step, and developing scientific experiments. They can write more complex stories full of abstract ideas and plot twists. They can write poetry laced with metaphors. They learn best in their own learning style but many can do some great discussion at this age.

    These tips might help choose what to teach your children and when. (No algebra for 4th graders- concrete math instead. Thinking-required courses like philosophy or psychology for high schoolers.)

    Get your homeschooler involved in understanding himself, his siblings, his parents and his grandparents.

    Our Human Development text is a one-credit high school health course. It discusses the ways people grow and change from womb to old age: physically, cognitively, and socially.

    Presented from a Christian worldview.

    Good, solid, useful information for teens (and adults).

     

    Brain Development in Children


  • SAT Prep Reading - Developing Neural Stamina in High School

    By Vicki Tillman on 24 September 2014 / High School Language Arts, Homeschool High School, Testing / 0 Comment

    I am thankful for World Literature and British Literature and the many difficult books that my kids have read during their homeschool high school years. I’ll tell you why:

    SAT Prep Reading is important. I was reading some sample questions from the new edition of the SAT that will be released in 2016. Some of the questions seem quite logical and easy to read. However, a couple of them require careful attention to a passage that is written in a dense and complicated manner. (Here is a post in US News and World Report with sample questions: )

    sat prep reading

     

    SAT Prep Reading

     

    I wonder how many kids who are immersed in modern literature will have the focus-stamina and vocabulary power to comfortably read those passages. Fortunately, many homeschool parents give their high schoolers a good mix of modern, religious, and older, more difficult books to read.

    My 17 year old completed challenging books over his high school years (some are listed below, and many more not on this list). He also completed study guides from 7 Sisters which helped develop real vocabulary and comprehension/inference skills- in a user-friendly, no-busywork format.

    The Republic- Plato

    Antigone- Sophocles

    The Epic of Gilgamesh

    Les Miserables- Victor Hugo

    The Picture of Dorian Gray- Oscar Wilde

    The Three Musketeers- Alexandre Dumas

    Uncle Vanya- Anton Checkov

    A Tale of Two Cities- Charles Dickens

    Sense and Sensibility- Jane Austen

    Pilgrim’s Progress- John Bunyan

    The Invisible Man- HG Wells

    Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde- RL Stevenson

    The Practice of the Presence of God- Brother Lawrence

    Born Again- Chuck Colson

    These have helped him develop neural stamina for tough SATs or college classes. Each of the books helped him develop critical thinking skills and a strong vocabulary. He was well prepared for the SATs and college.

    I highly recommend each of these for your homeschool high schooler. I recommend spreading them out over the years and adding lots of fun, inspirational or topical reading, too. Here is a link from our local homeschool umbrella school in case you’re wondering HOW much reading a homeschool high schooler should do.

     

    SAT Prep Reading


  • Evaluate Your Homeschool's Success

    By Sabrina Justison on 23 September 2014 / Helping Each Other / 0 Comment

    Do you take a moment periodically to evaluate your homeschool's success? Remembering your long-term as well as short-term goals for homeschooling will help you evaluate homeschool success with a simple question word.

    WHY?

    evaluate homeschool success

    Evaluate Homeschool Success

    It's a wise thing to ask some "WHY?" questions about your homeschool.  Checking on the content, the rhythm and the mood of our homeschools helps us make course corrections that bless parents and students both.

    Taking a moment to ask some "WHY?" questions may help you determine whether or not your homeschool needs a course correction before you end up somewhere you didn't want to at year end!

    * WHY did I choose this curriculum for this subject?  Is it moving us toward that goal?

    * If not, WHY isn't it moving us toward that goal?  What about it ISN'T working for us in our house right now?

    * WHY did I commit to the various co-ops, clubs, day-school classes, and activities that I chose?  WHY did I think they would be a good use of our time and energy?  Are they proving to be what I thought they would be?

    * If not, WHY aren't they a good use of our time or our energy?  What is being sacrificed in order to participate in these things, and how much is that sacrifice really costing us?

    * WHY did I connect with the other homeschoolers I chose this year for cooperative homeschool activities?  Are those relationships playing out in a positive way for all involved?

    * If not, WHY aren't we meshing well with one another?  Are there things to work on in my character, in my children's characters that would make these relationships healthier?  Are there things in the character of others (beyond my control entirely) that are proving to be toxic influences on us?

    A course correction now is a whole lot less expensive than a year of frustration and loss.

    Don't be afraid to ask WHY!  You might learn some really important stuff.

    (Bonus Idea: Ask your homeschool student for input, too! You might be amazed at what your kid has to offer as you evaluate homeschool success side-by-side!)

    evaluate homeschool success

    For more on ways to include your child in the success of your homeschool's structure and content, check out this post:

    Homeschool Goals: How to Set Them, and Why Your Kid Should Be Involved in the Process

    Help your teens learn the importance of asking WHY and digging beyond the surface of events. 7Sisters World History and Philosophy encourages them to think about the ideas that drive actions!


  • Curriculum for Your High School Homeschool

    By Vicki Tillman on 22 September 2014 / Curricula, Homeschool High School / 0 Comment

    Among all of the Sisters at 7SistersHomeschool.com, we've homeschooled 26 children through graduation. (And taught hundreds of others in co-ops and group classes over the past 20 years.)

    Years ago we found that sometimes the available curriculum was a poor fit for our kids OR was so full of busywork that we didn't have time to do the education of REAL life.
    curriculum high school homeschool

    Curriculum for High School Homeschool

    So each of us out of our expertise, have developed curriculum that has been the RIGHT fit for our homeschooling high schoolers' educational and time-stewardship needs. Our curriculum includes:

    curriculum high school homeschool

    Our kids (and the kids in our classes) have found that 7 Sisters homeschool curriculum is AWESOME because:

     

    1. The conversational writing style and friendly manner

    Material is not presented in an over-bearing, too serious manner. Our curriculum for high school homeschool students does NOT insult them by including time-wasting busywork.

    2. Christian worldview of the e-texts and guides

    This is especially important in subjects like Psychology, Human Development, and Philosophy. We want our teens' formative thinking exposed to curriculum that enhances their faith.

    3. No busywork or over-kill

    Our kids got GREAT education and still had TIME to develop the other things a transcript needs (service, extra-curriculars, competitions.)

    4. Easy adaptability for use at various high school levels

    Many colleges are requiring that the "academic level" of each core class be reported on the transcript. (There is no standard method, but here are the How-to's of Levels that we've learned.) Each downloadable guide and text includes EASY instructions on ways to tweak the level of the material to fit the needs of your high schooler and his/her transcript.

     

    Here is a general idea of how levels work in 7 Sisters curriculum (specific, clear instructions are in the front of each downloadable guide or text):

    -Level 2 (Average High School). Some of the work done verbally, no special assignments.

    -Level 3 (College Prep). Work in text completed per instructions in text, no special assignments.

    -Level 4 (Advanced). Work in text completed along with some special assignments such as projects, special-topic books,      or papers.

    -Level 5 (Honors). Work in text completed along with a rigorous number of special assignments including projects, special-topic books, or papers.

    Some of our teens completed Honors- or Advanced-levels in their courses. Some of our teens did not need to spend time on Honors assignments, instead they needed to concentrate on apprenticeships while still earning an solid diploma based on honest work. These completed Level 2 and Level 3 work in their curricula.

     

    Our popular Kindle Book is only $2.99!  Homeschool High School: You CAN Do It!

    Homeschool l High School: You Can Do It!


  • Why Study Financial Literacy - Consumer Math in High School is Not Enough!

    By Sabrina Justison on 21 September 2014 / Homeschool High School, Math & Economics / 0 Comment

    Consumer Math in High School - of course! But don't our teens need more than the basic arithmetic involved in financial management?

    Financial Literacy is so much MORE than simple Consumer Math (but still fills that Consumer Math High School requirement).

    The picture below is of my son, Jake and fabulous daughter-in-law, Leigha at their (carefully budgeted!!) wedding last fall. The wise words that follow are from Sara Hayes.  Enjoy this practical advice from 7Sister Sara on the importance of Financial Literacy as a course of study for your teen. Consumer Math in high school is not enough.

    consumer math in high school

    Consumer Math in High School

    Have you ever watched “Say ‘Yes’ to the Dress”?

    In this  ‘reality’ television show,  brides visit Manhattan's famous Kleinfeld Bridal boutique to find their perfect wedding dress.  Frequently, a bride’s dream dress is priced sky-high above her budget, and she will choose to blow her budget completely rather than settle for something less than that one dress that has captured her heart.

    Sadly, this lack of firm resolve and long-term financial planning doesn’t bode well for the days ahead.

    As much as we’d all like our every dream to come true, real life tells us we simply cannot always afford the top-of-the-line, newest, latest electronics/cars/fashions.  In fact, the opposite may be true; at times we may have only enough money to supply our basic needs – forget the ‘wants’ entirely!

    As your children graduate high school and move on to college and ‘real life’, you (and they) will be thankful if they have learned the difference between needs and wants, and how to master their money, rather than being mastered by it.

    consumer math in high school

    Sara's son and lovely bride at their wedding

    This is the purpose of a financial literacy course.  Our homeschool day school provides such a course to our high school juniors and seniors, those whose college/ employment years lie just around the corner.  These students are introduced to the basic concepts of budgeting and are taught to carefully plan the use of their money based on their values and long-range plans.  The normal day-to-day financial realities they’ll be faced with as adults are presented (insurance, taxes, saving and investing options), with special emphasis on the wise use of credit opportunities (credit cards, loans, mortgages) while avoiding credit pitfalls (overspending, burdensome debt).

     

    Sara's curriculum for her Financial Literacy course will be published here in 7Sisters EBookstore in January 2015! Get ready for special pre-order pricing in the weeks to come!

    consumer math in high school

    Sara Hayes, the financial voice of wisdom at 7sistershomeschool.com

    Our financial literacy course begins with searching out God’s standard regarding our attitudes toward money, and we apply Biblical principles throughout each unit.  For example, what is our responsibility to God as stewards of His money? What does the Bible teach in the areas of tithing and giving to the poor?  What spiritual pitfalls should we carefully avoid as we seek to wisely invest our money?

    Parents play an important role in our financial literacy course as they discuss numerous financial topics with their students in homework assignments throughout the school year: their convictions on tithing, their choice of financial institutions and insurance companies, their budgeting tips, the employee benefits they receive, and many other topics related to financial decisions and situations their children will eventually face.  These topics may not come up in normal conversation at home, yet parents who have years of experience handling financial responsibilities can give wise guidance to their children.

    Watching a young bride on television grossly overspend on her wedding dress is bad enough; how much greater our dismay would be to watch our own children handle money without wisdom and self-discipline.

    As parents, we can model responsibility and discipline in our own financial decisions, talk with our children about money matters as they come up in daily life, and provide a financial literacy course to equip our children to be responsible adults who manage their money wisely.

    ============================

    Part of being prepared for financial stability is to include Career Exploration in the High School years. Vicki Tillman's Career Exploration Workbook costs just $6.99 and may save thousands later for your student after graduation. The get-started questionnaire is FREE here.

    consumer math in high schoolConsumer Math in High School

     

    Homeschooling


  • Homeschool Help: Your Turn to Talk

    By Sabrina Justison on 19 September 2014 / Community, Helping Each Other / 5 Comments

    There are 2 questions below that we've heard this week from some of our homeschool friends:

    (Some of you are shy and share with us but feel funny posting here...which is always fine! Feel free to email thoughts and concerns to sabrina@7sistershomeschool.com!)

     

    Homeschool Help: Your Turn to Talk

    Homeschool Help: Your Turn to Talk

     

    - My teen likes to write but has lots of trouble getting thoughts organized for research writing. How can I HELP without accidentally doing it FOR him?

    - My kid handles it just fine when things don't work out the way she thought it would. In fact, she doesn't even seem to care! I want to encourage her to be responsible without becoming grace-less and overly focused on performance. Ideas, anyone?

    Do you have help to offer? C'mon, don't keep all your great ideas to yourself!

    It's YOUR TURN TO TALK.

    Offer ideas to help homeschoolers conquer the challenges above, or start another topic in your comment; it's up to you.

     

    If you need Homeschool Help: YOUR TURN to Talk!

    Tell us what's bugging you, frustrating you, confusing you, intimidating you. Let's all put our heads together and see if we can help each other.

    If you can offer someone else Homeschool Help: YOUR TURN to Talk!

    Tell us what's working great in your homeschool. Share success stories -- you are not bragging, because we ASKED you to tell us the good stuff to encourage us all.

    On Saturdays, we want you to comment here. There's no set theme. This is an "open thread" post.

     

    These simple rules will suffice:

    1. Start your comment with a topic word or phrase, like "Algebra I," or "editing writing," or "time management." That will make it easy for people to scroll through and read more on the topics that most interest them.

    2. If you are responding to someone who already commented, use the SAME topic they used.

    3. Keep it judgment-free! We need encouragement. We need ideas. We don't need to slam each other if we disagree. There are no cookie-cutters for creating homeschool success.

    4. If you share a link, make sure it's relevant. Spammy links will be deleted by admins.

    That's about it!

    SO...

    What's going on in your homeschool this week?

    Homeschool Help: Your Turn to Talk


  • Why Your Homeschooler Needs a High School Philosophy Course

    By Vicki Tillman on 18 September 2014 / Homeschool High School, Social Studies & More / 0 Comment

    Teens need to think about big ideas. They need to be introduced to the ideas that have shaped the world. 

    Philosophy is a POWERFUL subject for homeschool high schoolers to capture on their transcripts. As homeschool mom, group class teacher and advisor, I (and many teens I work with) believe that philosophy has been one of their most valuable courses. Let me tell you 3 reasons.

    high school philosophy course

    High School Philosophy Course

    Homeschool high schoolers should study philosophy because:

    1) History credits become more valuable when homeschoolers also study philosophy

    These days, high school history students are not simply supposed to regurgitate dates and facts. They need to be able to analyze, compare, contrast, and perspective-take regarding peoples and places of the past and present. When teens understand the philosophic mindsets of other people in other places and times, they can climb into those folks' shoes and better understand their cultures and decisions. This helps them be better prepared to write essays and reaction papers (as in SATs  and college classes).

    high school philosophy course

    This is the reason I asked my philosophy-teacher son, Dr. Micah Tillman, to help me write a TRULY USEFUL world history textbook. It is a text that helps students understand the ways people have thought throughout time and how they made cultural decisions based on that thought.

     

    high school philosophy course

    World History and Philosophy is the result of our collaboration. The philosophers and philosophies are integrated into an accessible survey of World History to show in a light-hearted manner that average (non-philosopher) high schoolers can enjoy.

    It is written for the average high school student to read and enjoy (self-study and NO busywork) with additional readings and assignments that help the college prep and honors students get their appropriate levels for their transcripts.

    2) When homeschoolers study philosophy, they become aware of the philosophies that permeate our culture.

    News stories, advertisements, health care, politics, sports, cooking trends, music and fashion are all influenced by philosophic ideas.

    3) Philosophy adds sparkle to the transcript.

    The competition is heavy for college entrance these days. Your homeschooling high schooler will find it beneficial to have courses that are a little different than the normal, boring  "World History" that is on most teens' transcripts. Philosophy is one of those sparkle-making courses. World History combined with Philosophy is powerfully sparkly!

    Click here for my World History and Philosophy Pinterest board. (It has links to cool resources and Youtube videos.)

    BTW- For homeschoolers who have already completed World History and Philosophy and now have the philosophy bug: Dr. Micah Tillman has written a full credit course called Philosophy in Four Questions (we hope to be able to release the text later in the summer). Another light-hearted, self-study, accessible, with NO busywork text, Dr. Tillman addresses philosophy's four great questions and the philosophies that address those questions.

    And while you're getting your new academic year well-structured, watch Sabrina's vlog about how to Schedule Backwards (and download her FREE whitepaper on the Scheduling Backwards)!

     

    High School Philosophy Course


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